Veggie and halloumi fritters with yoghurt, mint and coriander dip

Our new year commitment to light dinners and heavier lunches means that I cook the following day’s lunch after we have had our evening meal. It was one such weeknight and around 9pm in the evening. I was tired and knew that we were going to have a heavy dinner the following day so I was looking for a light lunch recipe. I’d come across this recipe on taste.com.au and had stocked up on halloumi and zucchini/courgette earlier in the week. However, on that night I decided to jazz it up a bit and I don’t regret it at all! In fact, I declare it the ultimate savoury snack made with fridge leftovers – particularly veggies that are starting to look a bit sad. I’m sorry I didn’t take more pictures of the earlier steps. Hope you will give it a go and let me know what you think at canwehavesomerasam@gmail.com

 

Halloumi-veggie-fritters with a mint, coriander and yoghurt dip

Halloumi-veggie-fritters with a mint, coriander and yoghurt dip

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Sanjeev Kapoor’s Navratan Korma or Nine-gem korma

As the name indicates, this recipe is from my North Indian food guru – Sanjeev Kapoor. It features in his book “How to Cook Indian”. This book is different from most of my cookbooks in that there are no pictures. It is nearly 600 pages of recipes – joy!

Before I give you the recipe for this korma, a little bit of background and history. “Navratan” is an amalgam of the words “Nav” meaning nine and “ratan” meaning gems or precious stones. My first introduction to this term was when we studied Indian history in school and we learnt about Mughal (Muslim) rulers. The Muslim rulers brought amazing architecture to India such as the Taj Mahal , art and of course, some of the richest and decadent food that India is still known for. The most famous of the Mughal rulers was Akbar the Great (grandfather of Shah Jahan who built the Taj Mahal). Despite being illeterate,  Akbar liked to be surrounded by intelligent and talented people. He appointed 9 such people who were also his advisers and friends and he called them “Navratan” or his nine gems.

This dish is named Navratan korma as it contains 9 different, pretty components. The gravy itself is pale so as to allow  “9 gems” to stand out. I have given you the original recipe which serves 4. The pictures show you almost 3 times the quantity as I made this dish for a dinner party with nearly 40 people. This wasn’t the only dish at the party so the quantity was just right. In fact, I managed to keep a bowl of it at home which served us for lunch the next day.

Hope you like it as much as we did ! Also, check out my mum’s South Indian vegetable kurma. Can you tell the difference ?

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